About Park Wood PDF Print E-mail

Forthcoming Events

SUNDAY 20 APRIL - EASTER EGG HUNT - MIDDAY

Tickets £1 from Keys newsagents, Highfield Avenue, Waterlooville

SOCIAL/AGM Wednesday 30 April 7pm

Baptist Church London Road, Waterlooville.

Speaker:  Nik Knight - Creatures that Fly at Night - BATS!

Big OakPark Wood is a small area of semi-natural ancient woodland, to the west of the A3 road north of Waterlooville, Hampshire, between Wallis Road and Queens Road, opposite The Queen's Enclosure.

A remnant of the ancient Forest of Bere which once covered the Waterlooville area, Park Wood today consists of a core wooded area, and two former meadows, now partly regenerating with native species. It is distinguished by its ancient yews and other fine feature trees, and a wide variety of woodland plants.

Designated as a public amenity and nature conservation area, it is managed by the Woodland Trust, assisted by the Friends of Park Wood who have just been voted by the Woodland Trust the 'Volunteer Group of the Year'.

Trees and flowers


BluebellsTrees and shrubs along the London Road boundary include typical hedgerow species. Walking into the wood, look at the two fine English oaks - one almost directly in front of you and one to your right.

Further along the path, and on the far side of the ditch, is the lowest and wettest area of the wood. The trees here are mainly ash, birch and willow, with some young oak and yew. In a gladed area within the wood, you will discover two majestic yews, with their characteristic many-fluted trunks.

More than 50 plant species have been identified in Park Wood. Look out for winter heliotrope, lesser celandine, wood anemone and bluebells in the spring, as well as other ancient woodland indicator species such as solomon’s seal and butcher’s broom. During summer, you will find an abundance of foxgloves and spotted and twayblade orchids.

 

Wildlife in the wood


Park Wood is a perfect habitat for many different animals. Here the conditions enable them to thrive - foxes, bats, squirrels, as well as an enormous variety of birds, and butterflies, moths and other insects. One notable feature of Park Wood is the abundance of standing and fallen dead wood - home and dining table for many fungi and creatures.

 
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